Grow Edible from Northwest Edible Life http://www.nwedible.com life on garden time Fri, 24 Apr 2015 12:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1 Grow Edible is the periodic audio companion to the popular urban homesteading blog, Northwest Edible Life. Join host Erica and her guests to discuss the topics most important to today's modern homesteader: edible gardening, small space productivity, greener living choices, food preservation, small livestock, whole foods cooking, rational preparedness and more. Grow Edible from Northwest Edible Life no Grow Edible from Northwest Edible Life nwedible@gmail.com nwedible@gmail.com (Grow Edible from Northwest Edible Life) Urban Homesteading, Gardening, Cooking, Preserving and Life on Garden Time Grow Edible from Northwest Edible Life http://www.nwedible.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/podcast-graphic-iTunes.png http://www.nwedible.com Solar Power with Reeves Clippard of A&R Solar http://www.nwedible.com/0007_reeves_clippard_ar_solar/ http://www.nwedible.com/0007_reeves_clippard_ar_solar/#comments Thu, 04 Sep 2014 11:30:29 +0000 http://www.nwedible.com/?p=9608 Read More »

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In this week’s episode of the Grow Edible Podcast, I talk with Reeves Clippard, the co-founder of A&R Solar, all about going solar. Several months ago, after years of research and deliberation, my husband and I hired A&R Solar to install a solar array on our roof.

Since “going solar” we’ve gotten a ton of questions from readers about the technical aspects, the cost, the risks and rewards of the solar subsidy system and more. I asked Reeves to come on Grow Edible to answer all those questions and talk about the process of going solar. I learned a ton, and I think if you’ve ever considered trying to be more self-reliant or sustainable in your homestead energy production this interview will give you some great resources to help determine if solar is right for you.

A&R-Solar

Show Notes

Today Reeves and I discuss:

  • While solar technology itself is relatively simple, Reeves discusses how the “trick” to a good solar install is to understand how to assess your site to get the maximum production from your roof. A&R uses a tool called a Sun Eye to automatically determine solar exposure up on the roof, which is turn determines production of a solar array. Similar tools are available to home owners as well as professionals.
  • Why 2013 or 2014 may be “The Year of Solar” – we discuss that Solar installs are hitting critical mass and are beginning to be seen as more normal and are appealing to a wider range of folks (it’s not just hippies anymore!).
  • The full continuum of solar array options from grid-tie to off-grid, with a few “in between” options. Details on the technology that goes into a solar array, what gets powered, what happens in a power outage or at night, etc.
  • Why it might make more sense for some folks to just buy a generator, rather than investing in an expensive battery back-up bank.
  • Why Reeves believes a full off-grid solar install should be a DIY affair.
  • How to navigate the complicated world of solar subsidies, where to find info and who to ask about local subsidies, how the incentives in Washington are a bit different from many other areas, the problems with relying on a utility-based incentive, how Reeves interprets the complicated politics of solar subsidies and what the Solar industry really thinks about the current incentive structure
  • What other tools, including energy monitoring, are available to help people manage their energy use.
  • What a solar array costs, what it saves, and the various ways solar customers manage the cost involved in the array.
  • How folks should determine if a solar contractor is legit and where to go for initial vetting of solar contractors.
  • Why solar works in Seattle, what country is installing more solar panels than any other, and what misconceptions about solar drive Reeves nuts.
  • The new local project, Solarize South Snohomish County, that A&R is the installer for. This gives homes in South Snohomish County (north of Seattle) an opportunity to get a bulk discount on solar installs.

Resources for Today’s Episode

  • The A&R Solar Website.
  • Info on Solarize South Snohomish County, a program where residents of South Snohomish County (an area north of Seattle) can get a discounted negotiated rate on a solar installation. This is a very time limited program so if you live in South Snohomish County and are thinking about going solar, check this out ASAP.
  • Dsireusa.org, the Federal Database of State Incentives and Policies for Renewables and Efficiency. This is the place that can help explain the various solar incentives by state.
  • The National Renewable Resource Data Center, a good agglomeration of resources to help determine the solar energy falling on your roof.
  • PSCCU, Puget Sound Cooperative Credit Union, the Seattle-area Credit Union Reeves recommends for renewable energy loans.
  • NABCEP, the North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners, the third-party certification Reeves recommends for people assessing solar installers.
  • Solar Washington, a great resource for Solar-curious folks in Washington and beyond. This website has a list of questions to ask potential solar installers.

Podcast Stuff

Not seeing the podcast player? You’re probably viewing this in your email. Click here to be taken to the web-version of this post, complete with podcast player where you can play or download this podcast.

If you like this new podcast series, you might want to subscribe in iTunes or add the Podcast RSS feed to your preferred podcast reader. If you think I should keep this venture up, help me grow the podcast by leaving a good review or comment in iTunes – your positive comments really help.

The theme music for the Grow Edible Podcast is Rodeo, graciously provided by my dear friend, the supremely talented Kristen Ward. You can find Kristen’s music on iTunes and AmazonRodeo is off the Last Night on Division album – it’s one of my favorites!

Perpetual hat tip to Erik and Kelly of Root Simple, the cool Godparents of the urban homesteading movement. Erik and Kelly put out a sharp and edutaining podcast in addition to writing great books, running a fantastic blog and generally spreading their urban farm wisdom far and wide. They graciously allowed me to steal their phrase “audio companion.”

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http://www.nwedible.com/0007_reeves_clippard_ar_solar/feed/ 4 In this week's episode of the Grow Edible Podcast, I talk with Reeves Clippard, the co-founder of A&R Solar, all about going solar. Several months ago, after years of research and deliberation, my husband and I hired A&R Solar to install a solar array ... In this week's episode of the Grow Edible Podcast, I talk with Reeves Clippard, the co-founder of A&R Solar, all about going solar. Several months ago, after years of research and deliberation, my husband and I hired A&R Solar to install a solar array on our roof. Since "going solar" we've gotten a ton of questions from readers about the technical aspects, the cost, the risks and rewards of the solar subsidy system and more. I asked Reeves to come on Grow Edible to answer all those questions and talk about the process of going solar. I learned a ton, and I think if you've ever considered trying to be more self-reliant or sustainable in your homestead energy production this interview will give you some great resources to help determine if solar is right for you. Show Notes Today Reeves and I discuss: While solar technology itself is relatively simple, Reeves discusses how the "trick" to a good solar install is to understand how to assess your site to get the maximum production from your roof. A&R uses a tool called a Sun Eye to automatically determine solar exposure up on the roof, which is turn determines production of a solar array. Similar tools are available to home owners as well as professionals. Why 2013 or 2014 may be "The Year of Solar" - we discuss that Solar installs are hitting critical mass and are beginning to be seen as more normal and are appealing to a wider range of folks (it's not just hippies anymore!). The full continuum of solar array options from grid-tie to off-grid, with a few "in between" options. Details on the technology that goes into a solar array, what gets powered, what happens in a power outage or at night, etc. Why it might make more sense for some folks to just buy a generator, rather than investing in an expensive battery back-up bank. Why Reeves believes a full off-grid solar install should be a DIY affair. How to navigate the complicated world of solar subsidies, where to find info and who to ask about local subsidies, how the incentives in Washington are a bit different from many other areas, the problems with relying on a utility-based incentive, how Reeves interprets the complicated politics of solar subsidies and what the Solar industry really thinks about the current incentive structure What other tools, including energy monitoring, are available to help people manage their energy use. What a solar array costs, what it saves, and the various ways solar customers manage the cost involved in the array. How folks should determine if a solar contractor is legit and where to go for initial vetting of solar contractors. Why solar works in Seattle, what country is installing more solar panels than any other, and what misconceptions about solar drive Reeves nuts. The new local project, Solarize South Snohomish County, that A&R is the installer for. This gives homes in South Snohomish County (north of Seattle) an opportunity to get a bulk discount on solar installs. Resources for Today’s Episode The A&R Solar Website. Info on Solarize South Snohomish County, a program where residents of South Snohomish County (an area north of Seattle) can get a discounted negotiated rate on a solar installation. This is a very time limited program so if you live in South Snohomish County and are thinking about going solar, check this out ASAP. Dsireusa.org, the Federal Database of State Incentives and Policies for Renewables and Efficiency. This is the place that can help explain the various solar incentives by state. The National Renewable Resource Data Center, a good agglomeration of resources to help determine the solar energy falling on your roof. PSCCU, Puget Sound Cooperative Credit Union, the Seattle-area Credit Union Reeves recommends for renewable energy loans. NABCEP, the North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners, the third-party certification Reeves recommends for people assessing solar installers. Solar Washington, Grow Edible from Northwest Edible Life no 1:11:12
Urban Goats with Rachel Hoff http://www.nwedible.com/urban-goats-with-rachel-hoff/ http://www.nwedible.com/urban-goats-with-rachel-hoff/#comments Thu, 28 Aug 2014 11:30:53 +0000 http://www.nwedible.com/?p=9541 Read More »

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In this week’s episode of the Grow Edible Podcast, I talk with Rachel Hoff about keeping backyard dairy goats. Rachel and her husband Tom run Dog Island Farm, an urban homestead in the heart of Vallejo, California. In addition to a big garden and the requisite flock of poultry, Rachel manages a flock of adorable dwarf dairy goats on a one-quarter acre urban lot. Her goats keep Rachel, Tom and their 16 year old son provided with milk, yogurt and cheese.

bailey

One of the resident goats at Dog Island Farm.

Key Takeaways

Dwarf dairy goats are small animals about the size of a Golden Retriever. They can be accommodated on an urban property, but are a serious commitment.

abby1

Goats are a serious commitment. They are not, however, serious.

Goats in urban settings will require imported feed, appropriate medical care, and shelter. Goats in milk require milking twice a day, and feeding newborn kid goats takes nearly as much effort as feeding newborn kid humans. Male goats – bucks – are generally not appropriate in an urban setting because they smell bad, and when your milking doe kids, you have about a 50/50 chance of getting bucks. All this should be considered before folks take the plunge into goats.

whiskey

Goats climb stuff. Be prepared.

Selecting goats and maintaining a good line of goats is key to ensuring a productive and healthy herd. Urban farmers should be very selective about the goats they buy, and should seek out a high quality breeder. In order to get the best genetics, small goat herd owners may need to hire breeding bucks out of the main breeding season.

king

Did I mention that they climb stuff?

Managing dairy goats is easier, faster and more efficient with two people – one to wrangle the goats and one to do the actual milking. Getting goats acclimated to handling of the udder area from a young age can make the eventual milking process smoother and easier. During the height of milking, a dwarf dairy goat will produce a pound or more – sometimes much more – of milk a day. Urban goat keepers should be prepared for the effort not just of the herd management, but also for the in-season effort of preserving that glut of milk.

overhead

An overhead view of Rachel’s urban farm.

Show Notes

Today Rachel and I discuss:

  • What can be done on one-quarter acre in the city: Rachel and Tom grow 6,000+ pounds of produce, plus provide all their eggs and dairy, and grow 75% of their meat. And they both have full time jobs outside the farm.
  • How to maintain a flock of dairy goats, including necessary shelter, fencing, food, breeding for dairy production, etc.
  • What kind of commitment is required for dwarf dairy goats. Rachel breaks down both the time to milk and the expense to feed her herd.
  • How Rachel deals with the inevitable male kid goats. You might think of this as the “pets or livestock issue” and we get into a frank discussion about the reality of sending cute, personable baby goats to slaughter.
  • The downsides of goats. Rachel talks about smells, screamers and bitchy milkers, and how she deals with all these potential irritants.
  • Breeding, weaning, and bottle-feeding vs. keeping the kids on their dam for milk.
  • The process of milking, including the steps Rachel takes to prevent mastitis in her milking goats and the expected daily yield from a dwarf goat.
  • Dealing with a seasonal milk glut – how Rachel preserves the milk she gets and how she suggests managing breeding for a more continuous fresh milk supply.
inside-barn

Inside the goat barn.

Resources for Today’s Episode

joel

Rachel and Tom meet Joel Salatin.

Podcast Stuff

Not seeing the podcast player? You’re probably viewing this in your email. Click here to be taken to the web-version of this post, complete with podcast player where you can play or download this podcast.

If you like this new podcast series, you might want to subscribe in iTunes or add the Podcast RSS feed to your preferred podcast reader. If you think I should keep this up, help me grow the podcast by leaving a good review or comment in iTunes – that really helps.

The theme music for the Grow Edible Podcast is Rodeo, graciously provided by my dear friend, the supremely talented Kristen Ward. You can find Kristen’s music on iTunes and AmazonRodeo is off the Last Night on Division album – it’s one of my favorites!

Perpetual hat tip to Erik and Kelly of Root Simple, the cool Godparents of the urban homesteading movement. Erik and Kelly put out a sharp and edutaining podcast in addition to writing great books, running a fantastic blog and generally spreading their urban farm wisdom far and wide. They graciously allowed me to steal their phrase “audio companion.”

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http://www.nwedible.com/urban-goats-with-rachel-hoff/feed/ 3 In this week's episode of the Grow Edible Podcast, I talk with Rachel Hoff about keeping backyard dairy goats. Rachel and her husband Tom run Dog Island Farm, an urban homestead in the heart of Vallejo, California. In this week's episode of the Grow Edible Podcast, I talk with Rachel Hoff about keeping backyard dairy goats. Rachel and her husband Tom run Dog Island Farm, an urban homestead in the heart of Vallejo, California. In addition to a big garden and the requisite flock of poultry, Rachel manages a flock of adorable dwarf dairy goats on a one-quarter acre urban lot. Her goats keep Rachel, Tom and their 16 year old son provided with milk, yogurt and cheese. Key Takeaways Dwarf dairy goats are small animals about the size of a Golden Retriever. They can be accommodated on an urban property, but are a serious commitment. Goats in urban settings will require imported feed, appropriate medical care, and shelter. Goats in milk require milking twice a day, and feeding newborn kid goats takes nearly as much effort as feeding newborn kid humans. Male goats - bucks - are generally not appropriate in an urban setting because they smell bad, and when your milking doe kids, you have about a 50/50 chance of getting bucks. All this should be considered before folks take the plunge into goats. Selecting goats and maintaining a good line of goats is key to ensuring a productive and healthy herd. Urban farmers should be very selective about the goats they buy, and should seek out a high quality breeder. In order to get the best genetics, small goat herd owners may need to hire breeding bucks out of the main breeding season. Managing dairy goats is easier, faster and more efficient with two people - one to wrangle the goats and one to do the actual milking. Getting goats acclimated to handling of the udder area from a young age can make the eventual milking process smoother and easier. During the height of milking, a dwarf dairy goat will produce a pound or more - sometimes much more - of milk a day. Urban goat keepers should be prepared for the effort not just of the herd management, but also for the in-season effort of preserving that glut of milk. Show Notes Today Rachel and I discuss: What can be done on one-quarter acre in the city: Rachel and Tom grow 6,000+ pounds of produce, plus provide all their eggs and dairy, and grow 75% of their meat. And they both have full time jobs outside the farm. How to maintain a flock of dairy goats, including necessary shelter, fencing, food, breeding for dairy production, etc. What kind of commitment is required for dwarf dairy goats. Rachel breaks down both the time to milk and the expense to feed her herd. How Rachel deals with the inevitable male kid goats. You might think of this as the "pets or livestock issue" and we get into a frank discussion about the reality of sending cute, personable baby goats to slaughter. The downsides of goats. Rachel talks about smells, screamers and bitchy milkers, and how she deals with all these potential irritants. Breeding, weaning, and bottle-feeding vs. keeping the kids on their dam for milk. The process of milking, including the steps Rachel takes to prevent mastitis in her milking goats and the expected daily yield from a dwarf goat. Dealing with a seasonal milk glut - how Rachel preserves the milk she gets and how she suggests managing breeding for a more continuous fresh milk supply. Resources for Today’s Episode The Dog Island Farm Website The Goat Justice League, a resource for urban goat keepers Storey's Guide to Raising Dairy Goats City Goats: The Goat Justice League's Guide to Backyard Goat Keeping The Backyard Goat: An Introductory Guide to Keeping and Enjoying Pet Goats, from Feeding and Housing to Making Your Own Cheese The Truth About Keeping Backyard Goats, a blogpost from urban homesteading website Living Homegrown. Podcast Stuff Not seeing the podcast player? You’re probably viewing this in your email. Click here to be taken to the web-version of this post, complete with podcast player where you can play or download this podcast. If you like this new podcast series, Grow Edible from Northwest Edible Life no 1:07:13
{Giveaway} Creating A Suburban Food Forest with Michael Judd http://www.nwedible.com/food-forest-with-michael-judd/ http://www.nwedible.com/food-forest-with-michael-judd/#comments Thu, 21 Aug 2014 11:30:28 +0000 http://www.nwedible.com/?p=9515 Read More »

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In today’s episode of the Grow Edible Podcast, I chat with Michael Judd, the author of Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist about how to create a food forest. Michael has an interesting history; he spent his early adulthood  in rural Latin America, including living with a Mayan community in Guatemala. These experiences gave him a unique opportunity to see mature food forests managed by indigenous cultures who have literally thousands of years of experience maintaining sustainable perennial food systems.

Michael Judd Permaculture

Michael’s Easy Step-By-Step Mini Food Forest

In this show, Michael talks about his step-by-step plan to create a food forest, even if you don’t have very much room.

Step One: create a large “patch” of super fertile soil with layered, top-down mulch, including a thick layer of woodchips to feed the fungal layer.

Step Two: Plant your anchor tree in your prepared patch – something like a dwarf apple, a persimmon, or even a large fruit shrub is good if you are very space limited.

Step Three: Surround your anchor tree with four types of perennial support species. Include nitrogen fixers like wild blue indigo or lupin, living mulch “chop-and-drop” plants like comfrey, insect habitat plants like yarrow and pollinator plants like echinacea.

Step Four: make as many patches as your space will allow, allowing them to eventually merge together. If you only have room for one patch, that’s ok too! Even one patch of a tree plus support plants counts as a mini food forest.

Step Five: As you expand, add additional layers to your patch: try edible groundcovers like alpine strawberries or edible vines and brambles like thornless blackberry to add depth and layered texture to your food forest.

Edible Landcaping

Show Notes

Today Michael and I discuss:

  • How to make a super fertile soil patch with layers of compost, woodchips and cardboard.
  • The psychology of Chop-and-Drop mulching.
  • The four categories of companion plants Michael recommends for a food forest “guild”.
  • How to adapt the food forest concept to small scale and urban backyard environments.
  • Why temperate-climate gardeners need to spread out their food forest plantings to account for lower light-intensity.
  • What “sneaky” edible plants you can grow to discourage feral hippies, confuse zombies and fool the HOA landscape committee.
  • How to save money implementing a food forest, and where it might not make sense to go the cheap route on your edibles.
  • Michael’s favorite unusable edible fruit for vodka infusions.
  • Why fruit growers should consider embracing alcohol fermentation as an efficient way to deal with seasonal bounty.

Edible Landcaping

Resources for Today’s Episode

edible-landscaping-with-a-permaculture-twist

The Giveaway!

Michael has super generously agreed to give away three copies of his book, Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist.

To be entered to win one of three copies of Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist, leave a comment below telling me what your dream food forest would look like!

Contest open until Wednesday, August 27th. Winners will be notified by email and shall have 24 hours to claim their prize. US addresses only due to shipping (sorry international readers!).

Good luck!

Podcast Stuff

Not seeing the podcast player? You’re probably viewing this in your email. Click here to be taken to the web-version of this post, complete with podcast player where you can play or download this podcast.

If you like this new podcast series, you might want to subscribe in iTunes or add the Podcast RSS feed to your preferred podcast reader. If you think I should keep this up, help me grow the podcast by leaving a good review or comment in iTunes – that really helps.

The theme music for the Grow Edible Podcast is Rodeo, graciously provided by my dear friend, the supremely talented Kristen Ward. You can find Kristen’s music on iTunes and AmazonRodeo is off the Last Night on Division album – it’s one of my favorites!

Perpetual hat tip to Erik and Kelly of Root Simple, the cool Godparents of the urban homesteading movement. Erik and Kelly put out a sharp and edutaining podcast in addition to writing great books, running a fantastic blog and generally spreading their urban farm wisdom far and wide. They graciously allowed me to steal their phrase “audio companion.”

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http://www.nwedible.com/food-forest-with-michael-judd/feed/ 129 In today's episode of the Grow Edible Podcast, I chat with Michael Judd, the author of Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist about how to create a food forest. Michael has an interesting history; he spent his early adulthood  in rural Latin Amer... In today's episode of the Grow Edible Podcast, I chat with Michael Judd, the author of Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist about how to create a food forest. Michael has an interesting history; he spent his early adulthood  in rural Latin America, including living with a Mayan community in Guatemala. These experiences gave him a unique opportunity to see mature food forests managed by indigenous cultures who have literally thousands of years of experience maintaining sustainable perennial food systems. Michael's Easy Step-By-Step Mini Food Forest In this show, Michael talks about his step-by-step plan to create a food forest, even if you don't have very much room. Step One: create a large "patch" of super fertile soil with layered, top-down mulch, including a thick layer of woodchips to feed the fungal layer. Step Two: Plant your anchor tree in your prepared patch - something like a dwarf apple, a persimmon, or even a large fruit shrub is good if you are very space limited. Step Three: Surround your anchor tree with four types of perennial support species. Include nitrogen fixers like wild blue indigo or lupin, living mulch "chop-and-drop" plants like comfrey, insect habitat plants like yarrow and pollinator plants like echinacea. Step Four: make as many patches as your space will allow, allowing them to eventually merge together. If you only have room for one patch, that's ok too! Even one patch of a tree plus support plants counts as a mini food forest. Step Five: As you expand, add additional layers to your patch: try edible groundcovers like alpine strawberries or edible vines and brambles like thornless blackberry to add depth and layered texture to your food forest. Show Notes Today Michael and I discuss: How to make a super fertile soil patch with layers of compost, woodchips and cardboard. The psychology of Chop-and-Drop mulching. The four categories of companion plants Michael recommends for a food forest "guild". How to adapt the food forest concept to small scale and urban backyard environments. Why temperate-climate gardeners need to spread out their food forest plantings to account for lower light-intensity. What "sneaky" edible plants you can grow to discourage feral hippies, confuse zombies and fool the HOA landscape committee. How to save money implementing a food forest, and where it might not make sense to go the cheap route on your edibles. Michael's favorite unusable edible fruit for vodka infusions. Why fruit growers should consider embracing alcohol fermentation as an efficient way to deal with seasonal bounty. Resources for Today’s Episode Michael's book, Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist. Ecologia Design, Michael's edible and ecological design company. A really cool series of videos featuring Michael at Edible Landscaping Nursery in Virginia, sampling unusual fruits and giving tips for how to incorporate these edible choices into a suburban backyard. My original review of Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist. The Giveaway! Michael has super generously agreed to give away three copies of his book, Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist. To be entered to win one of three copies of Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist, leave a comment below telling me what your dream food forest would look like! Contest open until Wednesday, August 27th. Winners will be notified by email and shall have 24 hours to claim their prize. US addresses only due to shipping (sorry international readers!). Good luck! Podcast Stuff Not seeing the podcast player? You’re probably viewing this in your email. Click here to be taken to the web-version of this post, complete with podcast player where you can play or download this podcast. If you like this new podcast series, you might want to subscribe in iTunes or add the Podcast RSS feed to your preferred podcast reader. If you think I should keep this up, Grow Edible from Northwest Edible Life no 1:20:06
{Giveaway} Lee Reich on Landscaping with Fruit and Uncommon Edibles http://www.nwedible.com/lee-reich-landscaping-with-fruit/ http://www.nwedible.com/lee-reich-landscaping-with-fruit/#comments Wed, 06 Aug 2014 11:30:23 +0000 http://www.nwedible.com/?p=9430 Read More »

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There are moments when audacity pays off. For years – years! – I’ve been full-on Fan Girl for garden writer Lee Reich. Lee’s been writing incredibly useful, readable books and magazine articles for decades and I’ve been learning from his expertise for about as long as I’ve been gardening.

lee-reich

Lee Reich: fruit guru.

So when I heard Lee was going to be in the Seattle area teaching people how to landscape with fruit, I dropped him a line and asked if he’d be willing to join me on the Grow Edible Podcast. To my rather huge shock and excitement, he said yes. So if I sound nervous in this interview, keep in mind I’m basically casually chatting pawpaw varieties with one of my gardening heroes.

Lee Reich's Garden

Lee Reich’s garden. It wins awards. Obviously.

Show Notes

Join us today as we discuss:

  • What is soil, and if it’s the same as dirt.
  • Lee’s Top Five Picks for uncommon fruits: gooseberries, alpine strawberries, black currants, shipova, and Nanking cherries.
  • What a pawpaw tastes like, and what early ripening pawpaw cultivar is best for short season climates.
  • Juneberry shrubs, a widely-planted, tough-as-nails ornamental with a delicious berry.
  • What berries Lee loves for juicing.
  • The first steps for setting up a luscious landscape of edible fruits.
  • How to simplify backyard orchard management and set yourself up with a lower maintenance edible landscape.
  • What unusual edibles have local commercial viability for small farms.
  • How Lee simplifies very complex scientific and horticultural knowledge into informative, beginner-friendly books.
  • What gardening myths Lee wishes would just go away, including the hard facts on fungally vs. bacterially dominant soil, compost tea and gardening by the moon.
  • Lee’s upcoming events in the Seattle area – go see him!

Resources for Today’s Episode

LeeReich_01

  • Uncommon Fruits for Every Garden, Lee’s presentation on rare and lesser-known edibles, is taking place on Saturday, August 9, 2014, from 11:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the WSU Mount Vernon Northwestern Washington Research and Extension Center. Details here.
  • Luscious Landscaping with Fruits: A Lecture & Garden Tour with Dr. Lee Reich is taking place on Sunday, August 10, 2014, from 1:00 pm to 2:30 pm at Magnuson Park in Seattle. Details here. Buy tickets here.
  • Lee is presenting at the 2014 Joint Conference of the Home Orchard Society, North American Fruit Explorers and the California Rare Fruit Growers. This conference is taking place from August 5 to August 9, 2014 near Portland, OR. Details here.
  • Lee’s website and excellent blog.
  • Lee’s books. I particularly recommend Landscaping with Fruit, The Pruning Book and Weedless Gardening.
  • The type of steam juicer I use when I need to convert a lot of fruit into juice easily.

The Giveaway!

Landscaping_with_Fruit_Lee-Reich

I’m giving away a copy of Lee’s book Landscaping with Fruit. I love it. With super lush photos, it’s garden porn at its best, but its full of great practical info too. For ambitious fruit growers who want to create their own luscious landscape, this book is one of my top recommendations.

To be entered to win a copy of Landscaping with Fruit, just leave a comment on this post with the answer to the podcast trivia question. You’ll find the trivia question right up in my intro, and Lee gives the answer over the course of our conversation.

Giveaway closes Wednesday, August 13th 8 pm PDT. Winner will be notified by email.  One entry per person, open to U.S. addresses only.

Podcast Stuff

Not seeing the podcast player? You’re probably viewing this in your email. Click here to be taken to the web-version of this post, complete with podcast player where you can play or download this podcast.

If you like this new podcast series, you might want to subscribe in iTunes or add the Podcast RSS feed to your preferred podcast reader. If you think I should keep this up, help me grow the podcast by leaving a good review or comment in iTunes – that really helps.

The theme music for the Grow Edible Podcast is Rodeo, graciously provided by my dear friend, the supremely talented Kristen Ward. You can find Kristen’s music on iTunes and AmazonRodeo is off the Last Night on Division album – it’s one of my favorites!

Perpetual hat tip to Erik and Kelly of Root Simple, the cool Godparents of the urban homesteading movement. Erik and Kelly put out a sharp and edutaining podcast in addition to writing great books, running a fantastic blog and generally spreading their urban farm wisdom far and wide. They graciously allowed me to steal their phrase “audio companion.”

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http://www.nwedible.com/lee-reich-landscaping-with-fruit/feed/ 68 There are moments when audacity pays off. For years - years! - I've been full-on Fan Girl for garden writer Lee Reich. Lee's been writing incredibly useful, readable books and magazine articles for decades and I've been learning from his expertise for ... There are moments when audacity pays off. For years - years! - I've been full-on Fan Girl for garden writer Lee Reich. Lee's been writing incredibly useful, readable books and magazine articles for decades and I've been learning from his expertise for about as long as I've been gardening. So when I heard Lee was going to be in the Seattle area teaching people how to landscape with fruit, I dropped him a line and asked if he'd be willing to join me on the Grow Edible Podcast. To my rather huge shock and excitement, he said yes. So if I sound nervous in this interview, keep in mind I'm basically casually chatting pawpaw varieties with one of my gardening heroes. Show Notes Join us today as we discuss: What is soil, and if it's the same as dirt. Lee's Top Five Picks for uncommon fruits: gooseberries, alpine strawberries, black currants, shipova, and Nanking cherries. What a pawpaw tastes like, and what early ripening pawpaw cultivar is best for short season climates. Juneberry shrubs, a widely-planted, tough-as-nails ornamental with a delicious berry. What berries Lee loves for juicing. The first steps for setting up a luscious landscape of edible fruits. How to simplify backyard orchard management and set yourself up with a lower maintenance edible landscape. What unusual edibles have local commercial viability for small farms. How Lee simplifies very complex scientific and horticultural knowledge into informative, beginner-friendly books. What gardening myths Lee wishes would just go away, including the hard facts on fungally vs. bacterially dominant soil, compost tea and gardening by the moon. Lee's upcoming events in the Seattle area - go see him! Resources for Today’s Episode Uncommon Fruits for Every Garden, Lee's presentation on rare and lesser-known edibles, is taking place on Saturday, August 9, 2014, from 11:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the WSU Mount Vernon Northwestern Washington Research and Extension Center. Details here. Luscious Landscaping with Fruits: A Lecture & Garden Tour with Dr. Lee Reich is taking place on Sunday, August 10, 2014, from 1:00 pm to 2:30 pm at Magnuson Park in Seattle. Details here. Buy tickets here. Lee is presenting at the 2014 Joint Conference of the Home Orchard Society, North American Fruit Explorers and the California Rare Fruit Growers. This conference is taking place from August 5 to August 9, 2014 near Portland, OR. Details here. Lee's website and excellent blog. Lee's books. I particularly recommend Landscaping with Fruit, The Pruning Book and Weedless Gardening. The type of steam juicer I use when I need to convert a lot of fruit into juice easily. The Giveaway! I'm giving away a copy of Lee's book Landscaping with Fruit. I love it. With super lush photos, it's garden porn at its best, but its full of great practical info too. For ambitious fruit growers who want to create their own luscious landscape, this book is one of my top recommendations. To be entered to win a copy of Landscaping with Fruit, just leave a comment on this post with the answer to the podcast trivia question. You'll find the trivia question right up in my intro, and Lee gives the answer over the course of our conversation. Giveaway closes Wednesday, August 13th 8 pm PDT. Winner will be notified by email.  One entry per person, open to U.S. addresses only. Podcast Stuff Not seeing the podcast player? You’re probably viewing this in your email. Click here to be taken to the web-version of this post, complete with podcast player where you can play or download this podcast. If you like this new podcast series, you might want to subscribe in iTunes or add the Podcast RSS feed to your preferred podcast reader. If you think I should keep this up, help me grow the podcast by leaving a good review or comment in iTunes – that really helps. The theme music for the Grow Edible Podcast is Rodeo, graciously provided by my dear friend, Grow Edible from Northwest Edible Life no 1:06:15
Paul Wheaton of Permies.com on Permaculture, Ponds and Perennials http://www.nwedible.com/paul-wheaton-of-permies-com-on-permaculture-ponds-and-perennials/ http://www.nwedible.com/paul-wheaton-of-permies-com-on-permaculture-ponds-and-perennials/#comments Thu, 31 Jul 2014 11:30:01 +0000 http://www.nwedible.com/?p=9384 Read More »

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Today on Grow Edible I talk permaculture, earthworks, and perennials with Permies.com founder Paul Wheaton. Paul is the always outspoken, often unorthodox and occasionally wonderfully obnoxious “bad boy” of the Permaculture world.

 

 

Paul Wheaton Permies.com

Show Notes

Today us today as we discuss:

  • What it takes to run the largest Permaculture forum on the internet.
  • Plant guilds and why apple trees are happier without the orchard.
  • How to let plants find their own best niche by creating lumpy, crazy, non-homogenous soil.
  • What carbohydrate will feed bacteria and starve yeast overgrowth in the gut.
  • How Permaculture lets Paul be lazy.
  • Why it’s so important that you put a crown on an earthworks dam.
  • Why sunchokes would be the greatest food perennial ever, if it weren’t for all that farting.
  • Paul’s new Three-DVD set on Permaculture earthworks, World Domination Gardening, and his mini-documentary on urban hugelkultur techniques.

Additional information and resources for today’s episode:

Not seeing the podcast player? You’re probably viewing this in your email. Click here to be taken to the web-version of this post, complete with podcast player where you can play or download this podcast.

If you like this new podcast series, you might want to subscribe in iTunes or add the Podcast RSS feed to your preferred podcast reader. If you think I should keep this up, help me grow the podcast by leaving a good review or comment in iTunes – that really helps.

The theme music for the Grow Edible Podcast is Rodeo, graciously provided by my friend, the supremely talented Kristen Ward. You can find Kristen’s music on iTunes and AmazonRodeo is off the Last Night on Division album – it’s one of my favorites!

Perpetual hat tip to Erik and Kelly of Root Simple, the cool Godparents of the urban homesteading movement. Erik and Kelly put out a sharp and edutaining podcast in addition to writing great books, running a fantastic blog and generally spreading their urban farm wisdom far and wide. They graciously allowed me to steal their phrase “audio companion.”

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http://www.nwedible.com/paul-wheaton-of-permies-com-on-permaculture-ponds-and-perennials/feed/ 18 Today on Grow Edible I talk permaculture, earthworks, and perennials with Permies.com founder Paul Wheaton. Paul is the always outspoken, often unorthodox and occasionally wonderfully obnoxious "bad boy" of the Permaculture world. -   -   Today on Grow Edible I talk permaculture, earthworks, and perennials with Permies.com founder Paul Wheaton. Paul is the always outspoken, often unorthodox and occasionally wonderfully obnoxious "bad boy" of the Permaculture world.     Show Notes Today us today as we discuss: What it takes to run the largest Permaculture forum on the internet. Plant guilds and why apple trees are happier without the orchard. How to let plants find their own best niche by creating lumpy, crazy, non-homogenous soil. What carbohydrate will feed bacteria and starve yeast overgrowth in the gut. How Permaculture lets Paul be lazy. Why it's so important that you put a crown on an earthworks dam. Why sunchokes would be the greatest food perennial ever, if it weren't for all that farting. Paul's new Three-DVD set on Permaculture earthworks, World Domination Gardening, and his mini-documentary on urban hugelkultur techniques. Additional information and resources for today’s episode: Permies.com, the largest permaculture forum on the internet. The World Domination Gardening DVD set on Permaculture style earthworks for people with some acreage. Link to preview and purchase on Vimeo.com The Hugelkultur Micro Documentary for urban and small acreage people interested in hugelkultur beds. Link to purchase on Scubbly. Paul's Richsoil.com articles on hugelkultur, lawn care for the cheap and lazy, and rocket mass heaters. My own experiments in building a half-ass hugelkultur bed. Not seeing the podcast player? You're probably viewing this in your email. Click here to be taken to the web-version of this post, complete with podcast player where you can play or download this podcast. If you like this new podcast series, you might want to subscribe in iTunes or add the Podcast RSS feed to your preferred podcast reader. If you think I should keep this up, help me grow the podcast by leaving a good review or comment in iTunes – that really helps. The theme music for the Grow Edible Podcast is Rodeo, graciously provided by my friend, the supremely talented Kristen Ward. You can find Kristen’s music on iTunes and Amazon. Rodeo is off the Last Night on Division album – it’s one of my favorites! Perpetual hat tip to Erik and Kelly of Root Simple, the cool Godparents of the urban homesteading movement. Erik and Kelly put out a sharp and edutaining podcast in addition to writing great books, running a fantastic blog and generally spreading their urban farm wisdom far and wide. They graciously allowed me to steal their phrase “audio companion.” Grow Edible from Northwest Edible Life no 1:04:03
Homebrewing Basics, Hops For Aroma, Carbonation Techniques and More http://www.nwedible.com/homebrewing-basics-hops-for-aroma-carbonation-techniques-and-more/ http://www.nwedible.com/homebrewing-basics-hops-for-aroma-carbonation-techniques-and-more/#comments Thu, 24 Jul 2014 15:30:05 +0000 http://www.nwedible.com/?p=9377 Read More »

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Today on Grow Edible I talk homebrewing with NW Edible’s very own Homebrew Husband. Nick covers the four basic steps of homebrewing and talks about how to use hops to get your ideal blend of aroma and bitterness. He explains the importance of temperature control in mashing and how brewers select for short chain or long chain sugars through temperature control. This podcast is full of great advice on how to craft a truly great DIY beer.

Four Steps Of Homebrewing

Show Notes

Today we discuss:

  • The four steps to making great beer.
  • What the heck is malt?
  • The importance of hops for adding flavor and aroma to beer, and how to control the bitterness and aroma in your beer by properly timing your hop additions.
  • Some of the history of beer and how the male dominated hobby of homebrewing used to be “woman’s work.”
  • Why carbonation is critical to the overall experience of drinking beer.
  • Homebrew as a living, developing ferment .

Additional information and resources for today’s episode:

  • Radical Brewing by Randy Mosher, the book Nick describes as his biggest brewing inspiration.
  • How To Brew by John Palmer, Nick’s favorite brewing reference guide to everything from “your first brew” to advanced all grain techniques. The second edition is for sale here on Amazon, the first edition has been made available for free online by the author on his website.
  • Freshops, Nick’s preferred whole-leaf hop provider.
  • Wyeast 1098 Liquid Yeast, Nick’s go-to yeast for most ale-style brews.
  • The carbonation and kegging system Nick uses to turn his beer nice and bubbly, then dispense it “on tap.”

If you like this new podcast series, you might want to subscribe in iTunes or add the Podcast RSS feed to your preferred podcast reader. If you think I should keep this up, help me grow the podcast by leaving a good review or comment in iTunes – that really helps.

The theme music for the Grow Edible is Rodeo, graciously provided by the supremely talented Kristen Ward. You can find Kristen’s music on iTunes and AmazonRodeo is off the Last Night on Division album – it’s one of my favorites!

Perpetual hat tip to Erik and Kelly of Root Simple, the cool Godparents of the urban homesteading movement. Erik and Kelly put out a sharp and edutaining podcast in addition to writing great books, running a fantastic blog and generally spreading their urban farm wisdom far and wide. They graciously allowed me to steal their phrase “audio companion.”

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http://www.nwedible.com/homebrewing-basics-hops-for-aroma-carbonation-techniques-and-more/feed/ 2 Today on Grow Edible I talk homebrewing with NW Edible's very own Homebrew Husband. Nick covers the four basic steps of homebrewing and talks about how to use hops to get your ideal blend of aroma and bitterness. Today on Grow Edible I talk homebrewing with NW Edible's very own Homebrew Husband. Nick covers the four basic steps of homebrewing and talks about how to use hops to get your ideal blend of aroma and bitterness. He explains the importance of temperature control in mashing and how brewers select for short chain or long chain sugars through temperature control. This podcast is full of great advice on how to craft a truly great DIY beer. Show Notes Today we discuss: The four steps to making great beer. What the heck is malt? The importance of hops for adding flavor and aroma to beer, and how to control the bitterness and aroma in your beer by properly timing your hop additions. Some of the history of beer and how the male dominated hobby of homebrewing used to be "woman's work." Why carbonation is critical to the overall experience of drinking beer. Homebrew as a living, developing ferment . Additional information and resources for today’s episode: Radical Brewing by Randy Mosher, the book Nick describes as his biggest brewing inspiration. How To Brew by John Palmer, Nick's favorite brewing reference guide to everything from "your first brew" to advanced all grain techniques. The second edition is for sale here on Amazon, the first edition has been made available for free online by the author on his website. Freshops, Nick's preferred whole-leaf hop provider. Wyeast 1098 Liquid Yeast, Nick's go-to yeast for most ale-style brews. The carbonation and kegging system Nick uses to turn his beer nice and bubbly, then dispense it "on tap." If you like this new podcast series, you might want to subscribe in iTunes or add the Podcast RSS feed to your preferred podcast reader. If you think I should keep this up, help me grow the podcast by leaving a good review or comment in iTunes - that really helps. The theme music for the Grow Edible is Rodeo, graciously provided by the supremely talented Kristen Ward. You can find Kristen's music on iTunes and Amazon. Rodeo is off the Last Night on Division album - it's one of my favorites! Perpetual hat tip to Erik and Kelly of Root Simple, the cool Godparents of the urban homesteading movement. Erik and Kelly put out a sharp and edutaining podcast in addition to writing great books, running a fantastic blog and generally spreading their urban farm wisdom far and wide. They graciously allowed me to steal their phrase "audio companion." Grow Edible from Northwest Edible Life no 1:04:34
Ancona Ducks, Modern Meat Ethics and Saving Endangered Breeds with Boondocker’s Farm http://www.nwedible.com/ancona-ducks-modern-meat-ethics-and-saving-endangered-breeds-with-boondockers-farm/ http://www.nwedible.com/ancona-ducks-modern-meat-ethics-and-saving-endangered-breeds-with-boondockers-farm/#comments Thu, 17 Jul 2014 11:30:16 +0000 http://www.nwedible.com/?p=9306 Read More »

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What the Wha? A Podcast?

In this gig, I have the opportunity to talk to some amazingly cool people who are doing truly great things. Sometimes I even get to walk around with a Press Pass pinned to my boob so I seem all official. It’s all very surreal. Anyway, many of these conversations get stuck in blog limbo because transcribing an hour long phone conversation or in-person interview can take days.

I decided it was time to put those conversations and information out there, in a format that made sense – a Podcast! And so was born Grow Edible, the new audio companion* to the NW Edible blog.

podcast-graphic-iTunesGrow Edible is a way to discuss the topics most important to today’s modern homesteader –  edible gardening, small space productivity, food politics, greener living choices, food preservation, small livestock, whole foods cooking, rational preparedness and more – with experts who are making a difference in their arena. It also gives me take a break from writing, which is nice while I’m working on this book (writing…all…the…time. Brain…must….have…other….outlets.).

I’m proud to be talking to duck-breeders Evan and Rachel of Boondocker’s Farm for the Grow Edible debut episode. These are the guys who hooked me up with my ducks last month. I hope you enjoy the result as much as I’ve enjoyed exploring this additional format for sharing and learning. If you have any technical issues with the podcast aspect of all this, please let me know.

Ancona Ducks

My Anconas, purchased from Boondockers Farm.

*Hat tip to Erik and Kelly of Root Simple, the cool Godparents of the urban homesteading movement. Erik and Kelly put out a sharp and edutaining podcast in addition to writing great books, running a fantastic blog and generally spreading their urban farm wisdom far and wide. They graciously allowed me to steal their phrase “audio companion.”


Show Notes

In today’s show, I talk to Rachel Kornstein and Evan Gregoire of Boondocker’s Farm near Portland, Oregon. Evan and Rachel are breeders of heirloom seeds and rare and endangered livestock. They manage the largest and most genetically diverse flock of endangered Ancona ducks in the country.

Evan and Rachel with their pasture-raised ducks.

Evan and Rachel with their pasture-raised Ancona ducks.

Join us as we discuss:

  • The roll of ducks on a homestead, and how Boondockers is pioneering rotational grazing with ducks.
  • How two ducks in the backyard can help save endangered livestock breeds.
  • Snout-to-tail eating ethics and the challenges of selling “full animal” meat in a culture used to chicken nuggets.
  • Why DIY slaughter might be the next step in the sustainable local food movement.
  • How to embrace a “slow meat” philosophy.
  • Cooking duck and duck eggs, the awesomeness of romano beans and more.

Additional information and resources for today’s episode:

The theme music for the new show is Rodeo, graciously provided by the supremely talented Kristen Ward. You can find Kristen’s music on iTunes and AmazonRodeo is off the Last Night on Division album – it’s one of my favorites!

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http://www.nwedible.com/ancona-ducks-modern-meat-ethics-and-saving-endangered-breeds-with-boondockers-farm/feed/ 15 What the Wha? A Podcast? In this gig, I have the opportunity to talk to some amazingly cool people who are doing truly great things. Sometimes I even get to walk around with a Press Pass pinned to my boob so I seem all official. It's all very surreal. What the Wha? A Podcast? In this gig, I have the opportunity to talk to some amazingly cool people who are doing truly great things. Sometimes I even get to walk around with a Press Pass pinned to my boob so I seem all official. It's all very surreal. Anyway, many of these conversations get stuck in blog limbo because transcribing an hour long phone conversation or in-person interview can take days. I decided it was time to put those conversations and information out there, in a format that made sense - a Podcast! And so was born Grow Edible, the new audio companion* to the NW Edible blog. Grow Edible is a way to discuss the topics most important to today's modern homesteader -  edible gardening, small space productivity, food politics, greener living choices, food preservation, small livestock, whole foods cooking, rational preparedness and more - with experts who are making a difference in their arena. It also gives me take a break from writing, which is nice while I'm working on this book (writing...all...the...time. Brain...must....have...other....outlets.). I'm proud to be talking to duck-breeders Evan and Rachel of Boondocker's Farm for the Grow Edible debut episode. These are the guys who hooked me up with my ducks last month. I hope you enjoy the result as much as I've enjoyed exploring this additional format for sharing and learning. If you have any technical issues with the podcast aspect of all this, please let me know. *Hat tip to Erik and Kelly of Root Simple, the cool Godparents of the urban homesteading movement. Erik and Kelly put out a sharp and edutaining podcast in addition to writing great books, running a fantastic blog and generally spreading their urban farm wisdom far and wide. They graciously allowed me to steal their phrase "audio companion." Show Notes In today's show, I talk to Rachel Kornstein and Evan Gregoire of Boondocker's Farm near Portland, Oregon. Evan and Rachel are breeders of heirloom seeds and rare and endangered livestock. They manage the largest and most genetically diverse flock of endangered Ancona ducks in the country. Join us as we discuss: The roll of ducks on a homestead, and how Boondockers is pioneering rotational grazing with ducks. How two ducks in the backyard can help save endangered livestock breeds. Snout-to-tail eating ethics and the challenges of selling “full animal” meat in a culture used to chicken nuggets. Why DIY slaughter might be the next step in the sustainable local food movement. How to embrace a “slow meat” philosophy. Cooking duck and duck eggs, the awesomeness of romano beans and more. Additional information and resources for today’s episode: Visit the Boondockers Farm website, or find them on Facebook. To help send Evan to Italy as a Slow Food delegate, you can contribute here. There are a ton of great rewards for contributors to choose from. Info on the Power of The Duck Class - how to raise and keep ducks, from hatching eggs to slaughter. Tickets for that class are $30. You can purchase tickets directly from Evan and Rachel, or by donating to the Slow Food Fund - just pick the $30 Duck Class as your donation "perk". Get more information on Ancona ducks from The Livestock Conservancy. Storey's Guide to Raising Ducks by Dave Holderread (the Bible of duck care!). Evan and Rachel are carrying on the original Ancona breeding done by Dave Holderread. More information on waterfowl breeding is at the Holderread Waterfowl Farm & Preservation Center. The theme music for the new show is Rodeo, graciously provided by the supremely talented Kristen Ward. You can find Kristen's music on iTunes and Amazon. Rodeo is off the Last Night on Division album - it's one of my favorites! Grow Edible from Northwest Edible Life no 57:10